Wild Blueberries in the News

  • March 29, 2019

    Wild blueberries: flavour & nutrition in one small berry

    quench.me

    On any given day, you can walk into a grocery store and buy frozen blueberries. The most common berry used in frozen fruit is the wild blueberry, which has a whole host of nutritional benefits. It is also one of Canada’s number one fruit exports. I spoke with Wilhelmina Kalt PhD, a consultant for the Wild Blueberry Association of North America (WBANA), about wild blueberries. She shed some light on the difference between wild blueberries and cultivated blueberries, the production process, and the myriad of health benefits.

    Read the entire article here: https://quench.me/food/wild-blueberries-flavour-nutrition-small/

     

     

  • December 10, 2018

    Holiday stuffing hot takes and endless inspiration from 16 Canadian chefs

    www.cbc.ca

    Christine Tizzard, Chef, food stylist, and recipe pioneer from Newfoundland, says:

    I have done a lot of different stuffings over the years but my family always demands the traditional ‘East Coast’ version that includes these must haves: Lots of onion and celery sautéed in lots of butter. For herbs, savory is a must, specifically Mt. Scio Savory Farm in Newfoundland. And it must be cooked in the turkey.

    I personally like the addition of a cup of cranberries or wild blueberries scattered about. Both I have on my freezer, and I just toss them in before stuffing the stuffing in the turkey. I crisp up chopped chorizo or an extra layer of flavour. So good! And don’t be afraid to use gluten-free bread — it works just as well. And there are always a few gluten sensitivities when having a big feast.

  • October 31, 2018

    A case of the boos: Spooky Halloween treats

    Toronto Sun

    Ahh…Halloween! Who doesn’t like a haunting good time? Although in the middle of the week – there are parties being planned well into the weekend. And – let’s not forget The Day of the Dead coming up this week as well. According to Hallmark, Halloween’s history dates back to 700 BC, based on ancient Druid customs. The Druids, a Celtic religious order in ancient Britain, Ireland and France, believed that the souls of the dead returned to mingle with the living on “hallowed eve” – people dressed in costumes to disguise themselves from these spirits.

    It wouldn’t be Halloween with getting dressed up – be it wee ones getting ready to trick or treat tonight, or adults glamming it all out for upcoming parties. Whatever you’re planning, here are a few recipes that are bound to make your soiree a spooktacular affair!

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